The Remodel Roller Coaster

Over the years, we have helped hundreds of homeowners achieve their vision for a renovated home that meets the needs of their families and the way they live. During that time, we’ve discovered that most homeowners go through cycles of highs and lows during the remodel process. Remodeling can be a roller coaster ride for the homeowner. Seeing the completed design plan and selecting beautiful, new things are fun and exciting, but living in a construction zone where everything is covered in dust has its low points.

Because we’ve seen this high-low cycle so many times, we are familiar with which phases of a remodel typically result in highs (green) and which produce lows (red) for the homeowner.

The design plan and drawings:

Excitement builds as the new plans take shape and the homeowners realize that their dream is about to become reality.

Demolition:

As soon as the first wall comes down or the old flooring comes out, you know it’s out with the old and in with the new. The high of demolition can be short lived as appliances are moved to the dining room or the living room and preparing a meal means digging in boxes of kitchen items and navigating an obstacle course of construction materials.

Framing:

The project really starts to take shape. You can now visualize the new space and a feeling of optimism returns.

Rough-ins of plumbing, HVAC, electrical, and insulation:

Unfortunately, framing is followed by the rough-in of plumbing, electrical, HVAC, and insulation. Workers are in and out. The electricity might be turned off at inopportune times. Things are torn apart and it starts to seem that your house will never be clean again. You may be asked to make decisions about placement of outlets and fixtures when you really don’t know where the couch or bed will be placed at that point. It can be overwhelming to some homeowners. Additionally, this phase doesn’t seem to offer much benefit in return for the hassle because it’s all going to be hidden within the walls. You probably won’t invite friends over to see your new HVAC. The project may seem to crawl at this stage, but details are happening behind the scenes and inspections are taking place.

Drywall installation and sanding:

When the drywall goes up, it’s exciting to see the rooms finally taking shape. Unfortunately, that’s soon followed by drywall mudding and sanding—one of the lowest of low points for some homeowners because it’s dusty and messy. Be encouraged, however, because you will soon have smooth, freshly painted walls.

Cabinets, tile, painting, fixtures, & flooring:

When installation of these finishing items begins, some homeowners experience a great high point. You’ve been dreaming about these beautiful things for years. However, some homeowners may find this phase to have a low point because every cabinet knob and even grout color requires a decision and every decision has a price tag. Additionally, while cabinets, tile, floors, doors, and fixtures are lovely, their installation means more workers coming and going.

Now that you know in advance to expect the highs and lows of a remodel, we think you will be better prepared and equipped. We also have these helpful tips:

• Expect disruptions and changes to your family routine. You might consider having one room that is construction free as a quiet place to retreat. If that’s not possible, consider using the home of a friend or family member if needed.


• Know yourself. Not everyone can stay in the home during a major renovation. Staying off sight might be best for you and your family.


• Manage your expectations. Patience truly is a virtue. As part of our 7-step process, we include access to our online tracking system and coordination with your project manager. Our method also helps you navigate the decision-making process.


• Keep lines of communication open. We provide daily communication with your project manager.


• Remind yourself again and again that the chaos is temporary while the end result will be long term.